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Remote Career Tip: Find a Mentor

A mentor can be someone within your organization or outside your organization who helps you navigate your career. That's kind of a broad definition, but in reality, there's an extremely wide variety of types of mentors. That's why the first step is:

Decide What You Want

What do you want? Do you need someone within your organization to help you figure out how to advance? Or do you want someone who is in your industry, but outside your organization, to give you perspective? Are you looking for advice from someone who has arrived at the very top of an organization? Or do you need advice from someone who is a little closer to your particular situation?

Consider all of these questions, plus think about how you want to communicate with your mentor. Since you are searching for someone who can help navigate a remote career, make sure that someone has experience working (and advancing) remotely.

Choose a Mentor

Now it's time to find someone who meets your needs. Create a list of all the...

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Ace Your Remote Job Interview

You’ve applied to the remote job of your dreams, and it finally arrives: a message saying you’ve been granted an interview. Congratulations! 

But now, you're wondering: what the interview will be like? How can I make a great impression on the hiring committee?

I’ve brought in a guest to share some tips for how to do just that: Carole Stizza of Relevant Insight. She’s an expert in HR and hiring practices and consults with individuals on how to improve their interviewing skills.

Carole's responses to some common questions about interviewing for work-at-home jobs are below.

How is an interview for a remote position different than one for a traditional position?

Interviewing remotely saves you the headache of traveling, traffic that might make you late, finding the right location, etc. — whew! That’s a load off your plate!  

The drawback of having to interview remotely is the lack of physical connection: the handshake, the mannerisms of...

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Quiz: Are You Ready to Work From Home?

Think you're ready to work from home? Take the workplaceless readiness quiz to see exactly what your score is — and to see what you can do to prepare yourself to make the transition to remote work as seamless as possible.

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The Hidden Pitfalls of Working from Home

Thought of being able to live and work in the same space is incredibly attractive — and more and more people are taking advantage of remote workplaces. The benefits are many: workers save time, money, and energy by not having to commute and share their workspace with others. And employers save money by not needing to supply office space to 100% of their employees. Not to mention the benefits employers gain from being able to attract top talent from all over the country or even the world. But it's not all sunshine and rainbows: there are pitfalls to working from home. It's important to know what they are to be able to prevent or alleviate them.

You shouldn't be afraid of working from home. Everyone in any workspace will encounter similar challenges. But being aware of these pitfalls is necessary in order to be prepared to deal with them.

OK, let's dive in...

Isolation

This one's an obvious one. For some, working at home is the ideal situation because you don't have to be...

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Four Best Places to Find Remote Jobs

Want to find remote jobs? You have a few options to start with: 

  1. Ask your boss if you can incorporate location flexibility into your current position. 
  2. Find a freelance gig.
  3. Find a part-time or full-time position that’s either offered as fully remote or flexible.

This blog post will cover the resources you can use to find jobs in any industry at any level. Skill, industry, and level-specific posts are coming soon! 

There are a ton of job search sites out there, as evidenced by Google search.

find remote jobs google search

There is no way that I could list all of them here — and anyway, that’s what a search engine is for, after all.

This list is meant to be abbreviated so that it is manageable. When you are first starting to look for a remote position, it’s more helpful to explore a handful of excellent resources than waste your time combing through every job site that’s out there. That’s why this list only has four resources listed. If you want more examples,...

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Boost Your Remote Job Search: 5 Things To Do Today

You're already searching for remote jobs using job search engines and boards and you've probably already applied to at least some. If you're looking for other ways to boost your search for the perfect remote job, here are 5 things you can do today. These 5 things are simple enough that you can do in just one day that will improve your odds of landing that ideal remote position.

boost your job search

 

Boost Your Remote Job Search Today:

1. Update your resume

When was the last time you really took a look at that resume of yours? Are you sure it has all the most up-to-date information possible? Take some time today to really look through it, and use this list as a guide to create your amazing resume.

2. Reach Out

Reach out to someone in your network to let them know that you're looking for work. If you're not sure how to do it in an email, ask them to catch up by phone or in person so you can bring up the topic more organically. Remember that your personal network is very likely to help you land...

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8 Keys to an Amazing Remote Work Resume

Think of your resume as the very first example of remote work that you can provide a potential employer. It will tell the hiring manager whether you've read and understood the job description. It will also tell them how much you pay attention to detail and care about your work. 

As you conduct your remote job search, make sure your resume accurately reflects you and how you wish to present yourself. Make sure it is accurate and well-designed so that your experience and skills stand out.

1. Tailoring

Make sure you tailor your resume to the job you're applying for. For example, if you are seeking a teaching job, but you don't have much experience, you need to highlight any background that gave you valuable skills that could be applied to teaching. Remember that it’s up to you to show your potential employer what skills you have that would help you perform your expected duties. Your resume is your first chance to show that you would be a good fit for the team. If...

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Where to Find Remote Education Jobs

Did you know that the online education industry was valued at $107 billion in 2015? And that’s just elearning. The general education industry is much, much bigger. That’s good news for job seekers — including teachers, curriculum developers, administrators, and tutors. Traditional education institutions are also exploring more online options and incorporating more infrastructure that allows telecommuting, so you don’t necessarily have to be in the elearning industry to work remotely in education. All this to say: if you’re in the field of education, you’re in luck — there are lots of remote education jobs. If you’ve already checked out the four places to start looking for remote work and haven’t had any luck, try these options.

A tip on searching for remote positions on jobs boards:

There might not necessarily be a “Remote” or "Work from home" option in the location search field. If that’s the case,...

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How to Get Your Boss to Let You Work From Home

Want some flexibility in your job? You're not alone. You can find a new job that's fully or partly remote, or you can ask your boss if you can work from home.

If your company has a history of allowing telecommuting, then your conversation will be pretty straightforward. Since there is already a precedent for this practice, you can refer to specific examples or to that particular policy if it exists in writing.

If there isn't a history of telecommuting in your organization, then it's a little less straightforward. But that doesn't have to mean that it's impossible! It just means you will have to put a little more work into making your case.

To actually get your boss to let you work from home, you need to present a detailed plan. You can't just ask, "Can I start working from home?" and expect a positive result. The more prepared you are, the more likely it is that your boss will recognize the importance and feasibility of this option.

get your boss to let you work from home

Steps to Create Your Plan

Think Like Your Boss

...

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Use a Time Budget to Get More Work Done

There are tons of tools out there that can help you get more done. These include time tracking tools like Harvest, timers, or productivity trackers. My absolute favorite tool is a time budget. A time budget is just a simple spreadsheet that tracks two things:

  1. The time that's left in the day
  2. The time it will take to accomplish each task I have to do

There is a finite amount of time in a day. And no matter how much you want to, you can't fit everything into the 16+ hours you're awake. So to make sure you actually have time to:

  • Do your work
  • Sleep
  • Eat
  • Move (exercise is critical to your health and your productivity!)
  • Run errands
  • Do chores
  • Do fun stuff

It's way too easy to get burned out because we underestimate how long tasks will take. Also, we tend to overestimate how much time is in a day. Sometimes, this is because our time gets eaten up by meetings and interruptions.

If you use a tool like this, you're setting realistic expectations for your day. When you have realistic...

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